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Local poets compose poignant poems for Blossom Circles at Kings Head Meadow

PUBLISHED: 19 April 2022


Four local poets have composed poignant poems for the blossom circles that were planted at Kings Head Meadow in Castle Park last year as part of the Colchester Woodland and Biodiversity Project. The circles were planted as an area for residents to remember all those who have lost their lives, honour key workers and reflect on the boroughs shared experience of the pandemic and help to signal reflection and hope following Covid-19.

Local poets Peter Kennedy, Pam Job, Leslie Bell, and Martin Newell have each written a poem to be displayed at the four circles, centred around the reflections and experiences of the borough throughout the Covid 19 pandemic. All four poets will be at Kings Head Meadow to recite their poems on Friday 22 April at 10:30am.

The four circles were planted by members of the community including the Mayor and Mayoress and the Deputy Mayor and Deputy Mayoress, and by NHS and Community 360 workers, at the end of 2021, as part of the annual planting events that take place under the Colchester Woodland and Biodiversity Project.

The idea is based on the Japanese custom of Hanami (enjoying the transient beauty of flowers) which is an established part of culture in Japan. It builds on an initiative launched by the National Trust that has seen blossom circles planted as a Covid memorial in London, Newcastle, Nottingham, Plymouth, and other locations across the UK.

Dan Gascoyne, Deputy Chief Executive at Colchester Borough Council, said: “We are delighted to work with local poets to make the planted blossom circles at Kings Head Meadow an area of reflection for everyone across the borough. The aim of these blossom spaces was to build a space where people can visit to reflect on the events of the past 2 years, whilst connecting with nature, and these poignant poems really help to create a place for people to go to do just that.”

Martin Newell, one of the four poets involved, added: “I seized upon this invitation to write something for the Blossom Circles because I can think of no better way to remember those whom we have lost, than by the combination of simple verses and the planting of new trees.”

To keep up to date with the Colchester Woodland and Biodiversity project visit https://www.colchester.gov.uk/better-colchester/colchesterwoodlandbiodiversity/.
 

Page last reviewed: 19 April 2022

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