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Pub's licence amended after noise complaints

Date published: 23 October 2017
 
The Half Butt Inn in Great Horkesley has been prohibited from holding outdoor music events, following a licence review by Colchester Borough Council following complaints of excessive noise.
 
At the Licensing Sub-Committee meeting on Friday 20 October, it was determined that the premises could no longer rely on the Live Music Act in order to have unregulated music outside at the premises. In addition, it determined that no amplified or non-amplified regulated entertainment could be held outdoors.
 
The Council first advised the Designated Premises Supervisor of residents' complaints in May, after five reports were received of loud music coming from the premises on Nayland Road.
 
The complaints continued and on 26 August, the Half Butt Inn held an outdoor music event with live bands from 1pm - 10pm. Environmental Health officers visited the area after more than 15 local residents called to report extremely loud amplified music from the Half Butt Inn's garden.
 
The noise witnessed by officers was considered loud enough to be a statutory nuisance and the volume was not lowered at their request.
 
On 30 August, the licence holder was formally served a Noise Abatement Notice by Environmental Health. This prohibited further events in the garden of the Half Butt Inn involving amplified music from causing a nuisance, in addition a review of the pub's licence was requested.
 
Councillor Mike Lilley, Portfolio Holder for Safer Communities & Licensing, said, "It is unfortunate that a review of this licence has been necessary. However, Colchester Borough Council is committed to ensuring a good quality of life for residents of the borough and, when a venue fails to uphold this and causes public nuisance, there can be serious consequences."
 
Councillor Tina Bourne, Portfolio Holder for Housing & Communities, said, "Nuisance noise can have a real impact on people's lives, causing stress and preventing them from sleeping or enjoying their homes. Where we obtain evidence of a public nuisance, we use the powers available to us to minimise future disturbance to residents. Enforcement action is a last resort, but will be used if no agreement can be otherwise reached with the licensee."